proletarianprincess:

thebaeddeljar:

"Average Scottish singer would walk 3 miles" factoid actualy a statistical error. Average Scottish singer would walk 0 miles. Charlie and Craig Reid, who would walk 500 miles and would walk 500 more, are outliers adn should not have been counted.

im so mad

il y a 1 minute - 48 919 notes © spoopytransgirl
/CERYS /georgie


Source: spoopytransgirl Via: thanl

magui-gui:

when u and ur friends look fresh af

image

il y a 1 minute - 50 382 notes © magui-gui
/dannie


Source: magui-gui Via: tsarbucks

jolyswittygirl:

Dracula (1931)

Directors:

 Tod BrowningKarl Freund (uncredited)

Writers:

 Bram Stoker (by), Hamilton Deane (from the play adapted by)
I am….Drac-u-la. I bid you velcome. Thus does Bela Lugosi declare his presence in the 1931 screen version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Director Tod Browning invests most of his mood and atmosphere in the first two reels, which were based on the original Stoker novel; the rest of the film is a more stagebound translation of the popular stage play by John Balderston and Hamilton Deane. Even so, the electric tension between the elegant Dracula and the vampire hunter Professor Van Helsing (Edward Van Sloan) works as well on the screen as it did on the stage. And it’s hard to forget such moments as the lustful gleam in the eyes of Mina Harker (Helen Chandler) as she succumbs to the will of Dracula, or the omnipresent insane giggle of the fly-eating Renfield (Dwight Frye). Despite the static nature of the final scenes, Dracula is a classic among horror films, with Bela Lugosi giving the performance of a lifetime as the erudite Count (both Lugosi and co-star Frye would forever after be typecast as a result of this film, which had unfortunate consequences for both men’s careers). Compare this Dracula to the simultaneously filmed Spanish-language version, which makes up for the absence of Lugosi with a stronger sense of visual dynamics in the lengthy dialogue sequences. In 1999, a special rerelease of Dracula was prepared featuring a new musical score written by Philip Glass and performed by The Kronos Quartet.~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide.
Happy Birthday, Bela! (20 October). 
Original film
With score by Philip Glass 


mollykatheryn:

nightmare-syndrome:

I forgot the name of carmilla so I said that and google found it, I’m crying

#’dracula but before and lesbian’ can we get this on a shirt

mollykatheryn:

nightmare-syndrome:

I forgot the name of carmilla so I said that and google found it, I’m crying



universalmonsterstribute:

Happy Birthday Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó! (20 October 1882 – 16 August 1956)

universalmonsterstribute:

Happy Birthday Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó! (20 October 1882 – 16 August 1956)



http://renfields.tumblr.com/post/100480941926/dwightfryes-the-studio-did-not-want-the-scene

renfields:

dwightfryes:

"The studio did not want the scene where Dracula attacks Renfield to be filmed due to the perceived gay subtext of the situation. A memo was sent to the director stating "Dracula is only to attack women"."

well shoot me in the foot

It’s probably also important to note that…



Source: dwightfryes Via: renfields

"The studio did not want the scene where Dracula attacks Renfield to be filmed due to the perceived gay subtext of the situation. A memo was sent to the director stating "Dracula is only to attack women"."

well shoot me in the foot

il y a 15 heures - 58 notes


ok while on the topic of underrated actors: david manners. what a great harker.



i KNEW that stage looked familiar



also apparently bela lugosi was the person to convince florence balcombe to lower the asking price for the film rights to dracula?????